Monday, August 5, 2013

Keeping Busy

With Hubby gone, I was worried that I'd be terribly lonely and bored. So, I tried to make sure today had some fun things to fill it. This morning, while Alyssa was with the kids, I worked for several hours on the Selway-Bitterroot Project down at the coffee shop. Such a treat to hang out there, and as a bonus, I'm reading Norman MacLean's A River Runs Through It.  Bliss. 

Then, this afternoon, friends came to hang out and play. We fixed a big pot of spaggy, as Bean calls it. It was so nice to have them over and have friends for the kids, it made the day fly, although I think Bean is something of a force of nature to the three little girls who came to play. 



 

9 comments:

  1. So what is "spaggy" (sorry my question mark key on my laptop is broken, you will just have to imagine one :))

    Happy Wednesday!

    Kim

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  2. HA! I read you blog and love all the details so I just HAD to know :)

    Much love to you!!

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    1. Note to self: provide interpretations for Bean-isms. ;)

      Thanks for the kind words. I think I've seen you around the blindhomeschooler list? I wish you good luck with bringing your kiddos home. :)

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  3. Yes that is me! :)

    When we first started the adoption process I googled "blind homeschooling" to see what others were doing in homeschooling a VI child. Your blog came up and thank goodness!! I am a long-time reader of Nurtured by Love and homeschool in a similar style. Yet everything I uncovered about "homeschooling" "blind child" seemed contrived and very "special needs school at home". Bah. I'm SO glad I found yours :)
    Kim

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    1. It takes a leap of faith to think, yes, I can use this method for blindness skills too, because nobody does it, and most of the blind adults were NOT taught this way, so it's hard to imagine it working. But it is! Abi is so far ahead of any other blind kid her age that I've talked to, online or in person. And I think a lot of it is expecting her to have the skills a sighted child would have at the same age, and using the same curiosity and motivation that Unschooling gives sighted kids to teach it to her. Playing little games and teaching skills as they come up in context of regular living works SO much better than occasional formal lessons for little kids too.

      I'm excited to watch you and Marjorie teach this way. We could really start a cool new thing in blindness education: family-based, organic, age-appropriate skills that are as delightful as all learning is when it's done in a natural, child-initiated style. :)

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  4. YES!!

    Now please give me Marjorie's blog!! :)
    I worked a bit in special ed (mostly with kids with autism and developmental delays) and the "counterwill" (I learned this from Nurtured by Love) was so engaged in these kids most of the time spent with them was me trying to dodge it! When I read between the lines about our Nell Bell it sounds as if something similar is happening. It says "she only walks up stairs when she wants to" and that her mobility is limited by her desire (uh, duh). I hope to allow our little one to discover her mobility, her way. One step at a time.

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    1. Here's her blog, although I'm not sure how much she blogs about teaching. I mostly read her stuff on the listserv.

      http://www.morethanahomemom.com/

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  5. Yay!~ Another blog to read :)
    Thanks. See you on BH!

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