Saturday, August 3, 2013

Board Games For Everyone

Over the years, I've collected quite an array of accessible board games. Now that the kids are old enough to start doing family game nights on a regular basis, I hope they see some use!

I posted a while ago about adapting our Candyland game


Some of the games we have were adapted with homemade pieces, like Trouble.


Many were purchased from online sites that sell accessible games. 

Checkers. 


UNO. 


Yahtzee. 


Chess. 


Scrabble. 


Cards and cribbage. 


We've also discovered iPod games that work with VoiceOver. 

Movie Quizzle is one of my favorites. 


Stem Stumper was specifically designed to be played non-visually. 


Word warp works great if you turn off the timed game setting. 


iFarkle is a fun dice game that works well with VoiceOver. 


Of course, many verbal games that we play in the car can be enjoyed by anyone. Twenty questions, quizzes, riddles, jokes and math questions can be played by all of us. 

In the future, I'd like to adapt Pictionary using play dough, and make the Trivial Pursuit board tactile. That might be a good one to look for as an app, because if it works with VoiceOver, all of the questions are easy to read. 

Another game that's easy to use by both blind and sighted players is Mancala. A bonus is that they play it in Ethiopia, so it's another nod to Abi's culture. 


Some of the other standard favorites would be easy to adapt: Chinese Checkers, Pinochle, Parcheesi, Backgammon. I have a Braille Monopoly board that I made back in high school. 



It's possible to even find sets online of adapted connect four and tic-tac-toe, like in this kit, if you have the cash ( I don't).


Newer games like Settlers of Catan or Ticket to Ride pose a bit more of a challenge. I enjoy those games, so I want to figure out how to adapt them to play non-visually. 

Lastly, I snagged a pic of a Braille Rubik's Cube. I made one of these myself years ago, but I have no idea where it ended up. This one would be super cool if the Braille made sense, but from what I can tell, it's either another language, or the fun gibberish that results when a non-Braille user tries to make a Rubik's Cube in Braille. 


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